Conscious Thoughts

Should Cannabis Be Legal? That’s The Wrong Question: How Can It Safely Be Legal

Written by Kim Knight

 CTM have focused on the issue of Cannabis: should it be legal?

If you look at medical research showing how hopeful this soft drug can be for many people suffering from chronic pain, it’s hard to deny that legalisation should be taken seriously. The question is not should it, it’s how can it safely be legal for the right reasons.

Following the debate I watched on BBC News about this subject: should Cannabis be legal? I asked myself what is the big deal? Should we not be looking at models that have successfully managed to legalise this drug? For example, Amsterdam has allowed Cannabis to be legal for years. They appear to have successfully allowed this drug into society. They have a clear policy on the usage, within it, it states four main points:

  1. To prevent recreational drug use and to treat and rehabilitate recreational drug users.
  2. To reduce harm to users.
  3. To diminish public nuisance by drug users (the disturbance of public order and safety in the neighborhood).
  4. To combat the production and trafficking of recreational drugs.

Looking at these points two and four stick out. Surely if the drug were controlled in a safe way users wouldn’t need to go out of their way to obtain “bad weed,” laced with God knows what from the streets. It would be purer. “Dealers” wouldn’t need to ration the pureness with other stuff, which could harm users. Possibly, it could also be argued there would be less drug trafficking if cannabis were legal.

There is evidence suggesting Cannabis has an impact on the mental wellbeing of some users. This cannot be ignored and argued, that street drugs contamination levels increase risk, however in a purer form, surely the risk is reduced. A pure form can only happen through legalisation whereby dealers are not forced to maximize profits with bad batches of the substance.

It appears there are more pros than cons when you look at Cannabis use from a health perspective, and therefore,  is the reason I would support legalising the drug. As long as there is clear policy over how the drug is obtained, and control over the dosage purchased, regardless of whether it’s for personal or medical use. We have to remember as well the Cannabis use is cultural for some beliefs and view points.  It appears when I question this issue that the benefits around general health outweigh the “risk” around possible ill mental health, this is because mental health issues could be argued as down to misuse, and even “bad weed” circulating. If there is a way to make it safe, regulate use I’m for it.

Amsterdam has tried and tested legalisation as well as some states in America. Looking at these models, I’d support the UK’s efforts to use real-world examples proven to work. And then, consider relaxing the law to help the millions of chronic pain sufferers … and those who want a little high! Of course. It’s not that bad, nicotine and alcohol can do much worse than a soft drug that can increase creativity–if you believe Bob Marley, or generally chill you out! But it has to be safe to have a positive impact.


About the author

Kim Knight

Kim is born in 1983, and from London in the UK. She’s a mother to a beautiful toddler, a proud award- winning author (awarded Best Romance Novel 2017 for the novel A Stranger In France), and the editor of Conscious Talk Magazine. As a writer Kim enjoys creating stories with a diverse and multi-cultural line up, within the romance, romantic suspense and general thriller and crime genres. When she’s not reading, or writing stories of her own her other passions include practising her French, learning about society, history and culture, fashion, drawing, make-up artistry, spending time at her sewing machine dressmaking, watching make–up and beauty tutorials on YouTube, letter writing and being a mum.